Buying a Pet cat

Buying a Pet Cat

When you purchase a cat from a reputable breeder who is active in the showing community, you should get a cat from a line whose ancestors were judged as to how well they met the standards of the breed, and which has been part of a program designed to breed healthy and robust examples of the breed in question.

Buying a kitten is an important and long term commitment so you want to choose a breeder that has the best interests of the cat, their breed and you in mind.

A reputable breeder will be registered with TICA and perhaps their breed club, for example with Bengals a breeder might be a member of TIBCS, both organizations have a Code of Ethics.

Taking on a cat as a pet is a big commitment and should not be taken lightly. A cat will need attention, routine veterinary treatment, grooming and daily care for 10-15 years.

Too many cats end up in rescue homes waiting to be re-homed due to an owner deciding after buying the cat that they cannot give it the care it needs or cope with the financial commitment of owning a cat, the novelty of cat ownership wearing off, changes in circumstances or some other reason. Just as anyone would give careful consideration to their circumstances, lifestyle, commitment, time etc before starting a family, buying a cat should be considered in the same way.

A cat is not a pet that a child can be expected to be solely responsible for and will need an adult caregiver. It is important to consider other pets in the household and all family members when choosing a cat as a pet to ensure a cat will fit into the lifestyle and environment of the family as a whole.

The type of cat suitable for a particular adult or family will vary. Different breeds have different personality and traits and long haired varieties will generally need more care.

Below is an approx. guide to the costs of owning and keeping a cat.

Equipment

When buying a cat or kitten it will be necessary to purchase equipment such as cat bed, toys, litter tray, collar, etc and this can cost up to $200.

Feed

The cost of food will vary according to whether a complete dry cat food or commercial canned or a more healthy species appropriate diet of raw meats; cat food will cost approximately $20-50 per month or more.

Cat Litter

The amount of cat litter needed will vary depending on the cats diet but will cost approximately $10-20 a month.

Worming

Cats require routine worming treatments and this can cost $15-25 every 3 months.

Flea Treatment

Cats require regular flea treatments and this can cost around $10 per month.

Vets Fees And Insurance

A young kitten needs to be vaccinated and these vaccinations can cost around $75-125 initially and then the cat will require annual boosters at a cost of $40-50.

Insurance to cover vets fees in the event of illness and injury suffered by the cat can cost $10-30 per month.

Neutering

Spaying or neutering a cat can cost $75-350.

Microchipping

Microchipping a cat can cost $15-30.

Extras

Although the main regular costs of keeping a cat are listed above there are always unexpected costs that occur. In addition it is often necessary to purchase medical products for minor cuts, shampoos, replace equipment, etc. All such costs can mount up over a year. Therefore it is always best to factor in an additional cost of $250-350 per year for extras when working out whether keeping a cat can be afforded.

Summary

The table below gives a summary of the possible costs involved in keeping a pet cat.

Item

One-Off Cost

Annual Costs

Equipment

$200

Spaying/Neutering

$75-350

Microchipping

$15-30

Food

$240-600

Cat Litter

$120-240

Worming

$60-120

Flea Treatment

$120

Vet's Fees

$75-125

variable

Insurance

$120-360

Extras

$250-350

Total

$365-$705

$910-1790

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So You Want To Be A Breeder

You love your pedigreed cat, and you know other people would as well. She’s got a beautiful coat, brilliant green eyes, an a great temperament.   But before you begin imagining the adorable kittens you could breed and sell, it’s important to learn about the reality of becoming a cat breeder.

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